Talk with an Expert: 317-663-7602

New Safer Diabetes Drugs for the Future

Diabetes is a disease which affects more then 27 million people around the world and is considered a growing epidemic with more and more people falling prey to it every year. Current treatments and medications can keep it at bay but can induce life threatening side effects. A news article posted on September 10, 2011 at Medical News Today tells us how a "New Twist in Diabetes Drugs Could Reduce LifeŭThreatening Side Effects."

According to the story, researchers at the Danaŭ Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and the Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter Springs Florida have created drugs with strong anti-diabetic effects that seem to be free of the dangerous side effects like weight gain and fluid retention.

So far all of the studies have been done on overfed and genetically obese mice but finding suggest that one of the drugs while controlling diabetic symptoms does not trigger excess weight gain like rosiglitazone and pioglitizone does.

Bruce Spiegelman, PhD, of DanaŭFarber and Patrick Griffin, PhD, of Scripps led the scientific group that developed the series of compounds and say that although they are not suitable for humans they do give science a jump off point to develop similar medications that will.

Other diabetic care drugs such as thiazolidinediones which are very effective against diabetes have been linked to cardiac complications, including fatal heart attacks and loss of bone density. The way they currently work is by targeting a metabolic master regulator of fat development and basically changing the genetic behavior of the host genes.

The good news is that researchers have found that these drugs also block a process called phosphorylation, by a molecule known as Cdk5, which may just be more critical to combating diabetes and does not seem to cause the side effects. These finding suggest that is might be possible to create a drug which targets Cdk5 exclusively doing away with the side effects.

Testing is still being done on mice and is a long way from ready for humans but the research shows a great deal of promise for the future.

"This insight shows how you can make new compounds that appear to be safer, but you don't know for sure until a drug is developed that you can give to patients," says Spiegelman.

"This insight shows how you can make new compounds that appear to be safer, but you don't know for sure until a drug is developed that you can give to patients," says Spiegelman.

This post was brought to you by Healthinsurancemark.com. We'll help keep health insurance in Indiana costs low by comparing quotes from the state's top health plans. Our insurance quotes are free and so is our service, so you have nothing to lose. Contact us at 317-663-7602 to get started today.